Why Does Pregnancy Cause Nausea?

Why Does Pregnancy Cause Nausea?

Pregnancy causes many physical changes in a woman’s body, starting in the first few weeks of your first trimester. One of the unpleasant symptoms you may experience during your pregnancy is nausea, which is sometimes accompanied by morning sickness (vomiting). You may wonder what causes nausea during pregnancy, and what – if anything – you can do to alleviate it. During pregnancy, your body is flooded with very high levels of pregnancy hormones which commonly cause nausea among women in the beginning stages of pregnancy. In fact, studies show that as many as nine out of 10 pregnant women experience nausea or vomiting. Your body produces extra estrogen during pregnancy as well as “the pregnancy hormone” human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG), the hormone that your body begins to produce once the fertilized egg attaches to the lining of your uterus, in large quantities. Both of these hormones are necessary to support your growing baby, and both could be the culprit when it comes to your queasiness. The good news is, although it is unpleasant to deal with, nausea is not harmful to you nor does it pose a threat to your baby.

If you do suffer from a sensitive stomach, it could become worse while you’re trying to adapt to the myriad physical changes of pregnancy. As we already know, stress and fatigue cause physical reactions within the body, and these reactions can lead to nausea and vomiting during your pregnancy. The changes you’ll undergo are normal and natural, but they can still put stress on your body and cause mental and physical fatigue, especially during the first trimester. One way to minimize the stress on your body is to make sure you get adequate rest to help combat fatigue. Everything is harder when we’re tired, and during the first phase of your pregnancy your body is expending an unusual amount of energy as the fetus begins to develop within your womb, so your sleep requirements will likely increase.

For many women, nausea and vomiting disappear during the second trimester but for some, morning sickness continues throughout their pregnancy. It is vital to the health of both you and your baby that you receive proper nutrition throughout your pregnancy, and supplement with the prenatal vitamins your doctor will prescribe. If you’ve been thinking of changing your diet towards a healthier, more organic lifestyle, pregnancy could offer you the perfect time to make the change. If you do become nauseous, there are some foods which may help alleviate nausea and settle your stomach.

These include:
• Bananas
• Crackers
• Cereal
• Pretzels
• Toast
• Ginger tea or peppermint tea
• Ginger ale
• Lemonade
• Fruit
• Jello
• Applesauce
• Popsicles
• Lemon lime or other clear soda (such as cream soda)
• Rice
• Mashed potatoes
• Yogurt

You may want to do your best to avoid fried or greasy foods, spicy foods, creamy or overly rich foods or desserts, and any foods with strong flavors or aromas. These types of foods can trigger nausea, especially if consumed in large quantities. If you have accompanying heartburn, most doctors will allow you to take an over-the-counter remedy such as chewable antacid tablets, but be sure to check with your doctor first. If you do suffer with morning sickness, always be sure to re-hydrate with fluids after vomiting. If your nausea and vomiting become severe or chronic, your doctor may be able to prescribe a remedy.

Some methods you might try to help manage your nausea throughout the day are:
• Eating smaller meals throughout the day rather than three large meals
• Keep crackers by your bedside for early morning or late night nausea
• Drink less water with meals, more water in between meals
• Sniff or diffuse essential oils such as lemon or citrus, peppermint, ginger and lavender

You can also massage ginger, lavender, sandalwood or a combination of these essential oils combined with fractionated coconut oil or pure almond oil directly onto your abdomen or on the bottom of your feet. Another way to take advantage of the healing properties of these oils is to make a tea using one or two drops each of ginger, peppermint and lemon oil mixed into hot water, sweetened with honey or stevia.

At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health, we provide complete obstetrical and prenatal care, are fully equipped and trained to handle normal pregnancy and childbirth as well as high risk pregnancies and offer free walk-in urine pregnancy tests. We’re dedicated to providing Colorado’s female population with personalized, comprehensive healthcare for all phases of a woman’s life, not just when you are carrying a child.

If you’re looking for a team of dedicated professionals to help manage your pregnancy and ongoing healthcare, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment at our clinic. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

What To Expect During Each Trimester

What To Expect During Each Trimester

A normal, full-term pregnancy is 40 weeks in duration, but can range from 37-42 weeks, divided into three trimesters. Each trimester lasts about three months, or between 12 and 14 weeks. The first trimester of your pregnancy will be marked by many changes for both you and your baby that occur rather rapidly. Although your pregnancy may not be obvious to others during the first trimester, your body will go through enormous changes as it accommodates a growing baby. Some first trimester physical changes you experience could include tender breasts, nausea, fatigue, more frequent urination, morning sickness, food and/or aroma sensitivities, heartburn, constipation, and food cravings.

You may notice heightened emotions ranging from excitement to anxiety and find yourself both exhilarated and exhausted at the same time. For your baby, the first trimester is a time of rapid growth and development as the brain, spinal cord and other organs begin taking shape and your baby’s heart begins to beat. By the end of the third month, all the baby’s organs will be formed. To meet the demands of your growing baby, your body’s blood supply increases to carry oxygen and nutrients to the developing baby. You may experience mood swings during this time of adjustment, which is normal. If your mood swings become severe or intense, however, you should consult your health care provider for advice and support.

If you’re in your first trimester of pregnancy and haven’t already done so, make an appointment with your health care provider to begin proper prenatal care. Your doctor will tell you what to expect during the first trimester and answer any questions or address any concerns you may have. Your first prenatal visit will likely focus on assessing your overall health, identifying any possible risk factors and determining your baby’s gestational age.

Be honest with your doctor about your healthcare history. There is important information your healthcare provider will need to prescribe the prenatal care you need, so if you’re uncomfortable discussing your history in front of your spouse or partner, schedule a private consultation. Your doctor will probably discuss screening for any chromosomal abnormalities with you, including prenatal cell-free DNA screening.

If you have a chronic health condition such as diabetes, epilepsy, high or low blood pressure or depression, your condition could affect your pregnancy. It is vital that you convey this information to your healthcare provider and understand any complications you might face. To prevent pregnancy problems, you may need close monitoring, a medication change, or a change in your treatment plan.

For many women, the second trimester of their pregnancy is the most comfortable and enjoyable one. During this time, growth of your baby is steady and constant, with the ability to move about in the womb and hear sounds from the outside. Initial feelings of nausea and heartburn may gradually lessen and subside during this time, and fatigue may lessen as your body becomes adjusted to the demands of a growing baby. Most pregnant moms will feel the first stirrings of their baby’s movements during the second trimester. Your breasts and belly will continue to grow, and you may notice skin changes. Week 20 marks the halfway point, and your doctor will order an anatomy ultrasound between week 18 and 24, if not sooner. You should be able to find out the sex of your baby during your ultrasound visit, if you desire. You may be tested for gestational diabetes around week 26, with your doctor ordering dietary changes if necessary.

By the time you reach your third trimester, you’re in the home stretch! This time can be physically and emotionally challenging as you anticipate your baby’s arrival and prepare yourself and your home. You may experience back aches, swollen ankles and feet, and difficulty sleeping. Your baby’s growth will continue, slowing toward the end of the last month. Carrying your baby to week 39 is considered a full term pregnancy. Travel will be restricted during this time, with most airlines requiring approval from your healthcare provider before allowing you to fly, due to the risk of early delivery.

The last month will mark the baby’s final weight gain and development of the baby’s lungs. Movement may increase or decrease during this time, especially in the final weeks when your baby is getting into birth position. You may experience spotting and/or false labor, known as Braxton Hicks contractions. Your monthly doctor visits will have become weekly visits by now, and it’s important to convey any changes to your healthcare provider.

Here at Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health, we are dedicated to providing Colorado’s female population with personalized, comprehensive healthcare for all phases of a woman’s life, not just when you are carrying a child. We provide complete obstetrical and prenatal care, are fully equipped and trained to handle normal pregnancy and childbirth as well as high risk pregnancies and offer free walk-in urine pregnancy tests. If you are looking for a team of dedicated professionals to help manage your pregnancy and ongoing health care, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment at our clinic. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

What Are the Danger Signs of Pregnancy?

What are the Danger Signs of Pregnancy?Most women enjoy healthy pregnancies without complications, but it is always a good idea to be aware of possible danger signs of pregnancy you may experience. If you do notice any of the danger signs of pregnancy listed here, you should talk to your doctor or midwife immediately to ensure the health and safety of both you and your growing baby. Your doctor, midwife, or designated healthcare provider will routinely screen for potential problems throughout your pregnancy, beginning with your prenatal care visits, but there are general warning signs that apply to every pregnancy, even the low-risk ones.

  • Contractions that occur more than 4 times an hour or are less than 15 minutes apart
  • Leaking of fluid from the vagina
  • Pain, pressure, or cramping in your belly
  • Blood in your urine or burning and pain upon urination
  • Persistent diarrhea
  • Vaginal discharge with a bad odor, irritation, or itching
  • Vaginal bleeding
  • Vision problems
  • Non-stop nausea and/or vomiting
  • Decreased fetal movement
  • Persistent or high fever over 100°F (37.8°C)
  • Seizures
  • Intense headache or a headache that lasts for several days
  • Sudden weight gain (3 to 5 pounds within 5 to 7 days) with severe swelling of feet, ankles, hands, or face

Certain types of pregnancies and pre-existing conditions which carry with them inherent risks which must be understood for a peaceful and healthy pregnancy. These include:

High blood pressure. If you suffer from high blood pressure, it is extremely important to monitor your blood pressure during your pregnancy. If you have high blood pressure along with other symptoms, it’s called preeclampsia. Symptoms of preeclampsia include:

  • Headaches
  • Swelling of your feet, ankles, face, or hands
  • Pain in your upper belly
  • Blurred vision

If preeclampsia is present and remains untreated or becomes severe, it can cause brain, liver, kidney, eye, or heart damage. It can also cause seizures, therefore the need for proper monitoring of your blood pressure and communication with your doctor is vital. Your healthcare provider may recommend delivery of the baby as the best treatment for preeclampsia, if your baby has developed enough.

Multiples. If you are carrying more than one baby, your pregnancy is considered high risk. The more babies you carry, the higher the risk. Common issues associated with pregnancies of multiples include:

  • Preeclampsia
  • Gestational diabetes
  • Gestational hypertension
  • Low birth weight
  • Placental abruption
  • Anemia
  • Miscarriage
  • Intrauterine growth restriction
  • Birth defects
  • Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome
  • Cesarean delivery

Age. As our bodies age, pregnancy can take a greater toll on our overall health. However, many women are delaying pregnancy into their 30s and beyond, and still delivering healthy babies. You may have heard that any pregnancy after the age of 35 is risky, but there is no reason a woman of that age or older cannot safely carry a child to term. Some factors of pregnancy older women deal with include:

  • Greater risk of gestational diabetes
  • Greater likelihood of multiples
  • Greater risk of developing high blood pressure during pregnancy
  • Greater likelihood of low birth weight
  • Greater risk of premature delivery
  • Greater likelihood of a Cesarean delivery
  • Greater risk of chromosome abnormalities such as Down syndrome

While many pregnant women experience no discomfort at all, some common complaints of pregnancy include heartburn, nausea in the first trimester, frequent urination, backache, breast tenderness and swelling, and fatigue. If you experience any of the aforementioned danger signs of pregnancy, however, it is imperative that you contact your health care practitioner immediately so that they can help you rule out serious complications and advise you what further steps may be necessary. Do not delay, as doing so could further increase your risk of complications, putting yourself and your baby in jeopardy.

At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we offer complete obstetrical and prenatal care, for both routine and high-risk pregnancies. We care for women at every stage of life, from the child bearing years through menopause and beyond. If you are looking for caring OB/GYNs who will work with you to achieve and maintain your best possible health, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

Symptoms of Pregnancy

The earliest symptoms of pregnancy can appear in the first few weeks after conception for some women. Since some symptoms of PMS are very similar to early signs of pregnancy, how can you tell if you’re really pregnant? Although symptoms can vary from woman to woman and from pregnancy to pregnancy in the same woman, there are some symptoms that are commonly experienced by most women, sometimes even before a missed period.

  • Swollen or tender breasts. As soon as two weeks after conception, hormonal changes may cause your breasts to become tender, sore, or heavy and full. This can be one of the first noticeable symptoms of pregnancy.
  • Fatigue. During the early stages of your pregnancy, your progesterone levels will rise. This hormone can make you feel extremely tired, and in high enough doses may put you to sleep. Lower blood sugar levels, decreased blood pressure, and increased blood production that all occur during this same time frame may combine to drain your energy reserves, causing fatigue.
  • Symptoms of Pregnancy

  • Missed period. A missed cycle is perhaps the most obvious early symptom of pregnancy. This is often what causes women to take a home pregnancy test or see their doctor to verify their pregnancy.
  • Slight cramping and/or bleeding. Some women may experience a small amount of spotting or vaginal bleeding as one of the first symptoms of their pregnancy. Cramping is similar to menstrual cramps, and bleeding is lighter than a normal period, occurring approximately 10 to 14 days after fertilization, when the fertilized egg attaches to the uterine lining.
  • Nausea and/or vomiting. A classic symptom of pregnancy, queasiness can begin as early as two weeks after conception. Fast rising levels of estrogen can cause your stomach to empty more slowly, and since a heightened sense of smell comes along with pregnancy for many women, certain odors such as cooking food, cigar, pipe, or cigarette smoke, and some perfumes may cause nausea.
  • Constipation. Just as an increase in progesterone can cause fatigue in early pregnancy, it also causes food to pass more slowly through the intestines, which can cause constipation in some women.
  • Food cravings. At the same time that certain odors may have you fighting nausea, you may experience food cravings. These cravings can also be attributed to dramatic hormonal changes that occur in the first trimester of your pregnancy.
  • Mood swings. If you find yourself become more emotionally sensitive, prone to periods of weepiness, or drastic, rapid mood changes, you can once again blame an increase in your hormonal levels.
  • Headaches. An increase in blood circulation caused by the hormonal changes that occur during your first trimester may also trigger frequent, mild headaches. These often subside during the second trimester, when your hormone levels become more stable.
  • Dizziness. If you feel faint or dizzy early in your pregnancy, the cause could be low blood sugar. Maintaining a healthy diet and keeping snacks on hand can help keep your blood sugar levels steady. A drop-in blood pressure could also cause you to feel lightheaded or dizzy.

Although every woman and every pregnancy is different, any symptoms that become severe should be reported to your doctor immediately. These include:

  • Heavy cramping and/or bleeding
  • Abdominal pain
  • Extreme shortness of breath
  • Severe dizziness
  • Extreme nausea/vomiting or inability to eat
  • Weight loss
  • Persistent severe headaches/migraines
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Visual changes
  • Leaking fluid from vagina

It is important to be under a doctor’s care during your pregnancy, so that any unusual or severe symptoms you may experience can be monitored and your doctor can advise you on how to best handle the changes your body is going through. At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we offer complete obstetrical and prenatal care, for both routine and high-risk pregnancies.

We care for women at every stage of life, from the child bearing years through menopause and beyond. If you are looking for caring OB/GYNs who will work with you to achieve and maintain your best possible health, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to meeting you.

How Much Weight Is Safe To Gain During Pregnancy?

How much weight is safe to gain during pregnancy

Do you question how much weight is safe for you to gain during pregnancy? This is a common question for mothers-to-be. First of all, you are supposed to gain weight, so it’s important not to stress over it when you do. However, it is important to know how much weight represents a healthy gain for you, and when you should gain it. Gaining too much weight during pregnancy can present health hazards like gestational diabetes, hypertension, preeclampsia, and possible complications during labor and delivery.

Although you will need extra weight to support your baby’s growth and development, “eating for two” is not a healthy approach to eating during your pregnancy, and being pregnant is not a blank ticket to overindulge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released findings on gestational weight gain showing that 47 percent of American moms-to-be gained more than the recommended amount of weight during pregnancy. This put their health and that of their babies at risk both during and after pregnancy.

Not gaining enough weight during pregnancy increases the risk of low birth weight babies and pre-term deliveries. The recommended amount of weight gain depends on your pre-pregnancy weight; if you are overweight when you become pregnant, a weight gain of 15-25 pounds is recommended, if you start at a healthy weight, 25 to 35 pounds is recommended, and if you are underweight, 28 to 40 pounds is the recommendation. A lack of weight gain in the first trimester is not unusual, especially if you suffer from morning sickness. During the second trimester, weight gain should pick up. If you started out pregnancy at a normal weight, you should expect to gain around 14 to 15 pounds, as your baby is growing rapidly during this stage. During the third trimester, your baby’s weight gain will continue, but yours may start to taper off. You should expect a gain of approximately 10 to 12 pounds at this point.

To gain the right amount of weight during pregnancy, don’t use the “eating for two” mentality to double your caloric intake, or you’re likely to gain too much. Start by simply adding a snack of around 300 calories to your daily menu. Your meals and snacks should be comprised of healthy, whole foods whenever possible such as fruits, vegetables, healthy proteins, whole grains, and dairy products. It’s also important to stay hydrated by drinking water throughout the day, and maintain a regular exercise routine, even if it is a simple 30-minute walk around the neighborhood in the morning, at lunch, or after dinner. If you’re carrying twins or multiples, consult with your doctor about the correct amount of weight gain and exercise to maintain optimal health during your pregnancy.

While the volume of food you consume is important, the nutrition it contains is paramount to having a healthy pregnancy. When it comes to satisfying cravings, getting the protein and healthy fats that you and your baby need is the key. A high protein, high fat snack will keep you fuller longer than a snack consisting of processed carbohydrates. Think yogurt, cheese, and peanut butter instead of chips, crackers, or cookies.

At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we offer complete obstetrical and prenatal care, for both routine and high-risk pregnancies. We care for women at every stage of life, from the child bearing years through menopause and beyond. If you are looking for caring OB/GYNs who will work with you to achieve and maintain your best possible health, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to meeting you.

False Negative Pregnancy Test Results

False Negative Pregnancy Test Results

For many women, a home pregnancy test is the first indication they have of being pregnant. Unfortunately, sometimes these tests can return a false negative result. In other words, the test may say “not pregnant” when in reality you are pregnant. Sometimes a test can also return a false positive result, detecting pregnancy where none exists, but false negative results are much more common, with as many as 9 out of 15 women testing negative until seven or eight weeks. How does this happen? What could cause a pregnancy test to return a negative result when you are actually pregnant?

One reason a pregnancy test may return a false negative result is that the test is simply taken too early in the pregnancy to properly detect the presence of a developing fetus. The sooner after a missed period a home pregnancy test is taken, the harder it is for the test to detect the pregnancy hormone human chorionic gonadotrophin, or hCG. Every test is different, and some are more sensitive than others. A pregnancy test can usually detect hCG levels within 10 days of a missed period. Some tests can detect hCG even earlier, within a week of conception, but no test is 100% accurate.

Another reason you may receive a false negative on a home pregnancy test is that hCG levels vary from person to person, and your individual hCG level may be too low to be detected on a home pregnancy test. If your home pregnancy test comes back negative after a missed period, wait one week and retest. Some women may take up to three weeks after a missed period before a detectable level of hCG is produced. A negative result from a home pregnancy test does not unconditionally rule out pregnancy or ectopic pregnancy.

A third reason for a false negative result on a pregnancy test is diluted urine. If you drink a lot of water, it will dilute the hCG in your urine, and could cause you to get a false negative. Test your urine again upon rising in the morning, as this urine will have the most concentrated amounts of hCG.

It’s also possible to experience symptoms normally associated with pregnancy such as mood swings, swollen breasts and food cravings, which may be caused by PMS rather than pregnancy. On the other hand, you might experience what appears to be a menstrual period, even though you are pregnant. If you are having some vaginal bleeding but suspect you might be pregnant even though you have received a negative result from a home pregnancy test, it’s time to talk to your medical provider. Your doctor can conduct urine and blood tests to help determine if you are pregnant. Although it’s less likely, it is still possible to be pregnant even if urine and blood tests come back negative.

If you still believe you are pregnant after receiving negative urine and blood test results, your medical provider can perform a transvaginal ultrasound to determine whether you are pregnant. A pregnancy in your uterus should be visible six weeks after your last menstrual period. If there are no signs of an embryo or fetus in the uterus and your hCG levels are elevated or rising, an ectopic pregnancy could be the culprit.

At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we care for women at every stage of life, from the child bearing years through menopause and beyond. We offer women complete prenatal and obstetrical care, for both routine and high-risk pregnancies. If you are looking for a caring OB/GYN who will work with you to achieve and maintain your best possible health at every stage of your life, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health, and live your best life.

How Often Do You Visit the OBGYN During Pregnancy?

are obgyns considered primary physicians

Are you pregnant and wondering how often you should see your OB/GYN? If you are pregnant, your OB/GYN will set up a regular schedule of office visits to monitor the development of your pregnancy and your overall health. If you don’t have a primary care physician or did not meet with a health care provider before you became pregnant, your first prenatal visit will be around eight weeks after your last menstrual period. If your cycles are irregular, you should schedule a visit with an OB/GYN as soon after a urine pregnancy test is positive. At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we offer free walk in urine pregnancy tests. Most pregnant women have between ten and 15 prenatal visits during the course of their pregnancy. A typical schedule will look like this:

• Weeks 4 to 28: One prenatal visit per month

• Weeks 28 to 36: One prenatal visit every 2 weeks

• Weeks 36 to 40: One prenatal visit per week

During your office visits, your OB/GYN will discuss prenatal care and proper nutrition during your pregnancy, labor and delivery, and postpartum care. You may need to schedule more frequent office visits if you have special health concerns with your pregnancy. An ultrasound is usually performed in the first trimester to confirm the due date, and another is normally done at 18 to 20 weeks to confirm normal anatomy and development. The second ultrasound is an exciting one, as your OB/GYN can usually determine the sex of the baby at this time. Women over 35 may have one or more ultrasounds done before the baby is born, especially if low levels of amniotic fluid, bleeding, or pre-term contractions are present. Having ultrasounds during your pregnancy poses no risk to you or the baby, including during the third trimester.

At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we offer complete obstetrical and prenatal care, for both routine and high-risk pregnancies. We care for women at every stage of life, from the child bearing years through menopause and beyond. If you are looking for caring OB/GYNs who will work with you to achieve and maintain your best possible health, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

How Often Should You See Your OB/GYN?

Colorado Springs OBGYN

Do you wonder how often you should see a gynecologist or OB/GYN? As a general rule, all women should have a pelvic exam at least once per year. According to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, every woman should see a gynecologist before the age of 21, for several reasons. Although most women do not need to have a pap smear before the age of 21, a gynecological exam is a good idea, as it can reveal undetected health problems that can then receive treatment, such as UTIs and STIs. Questions you may have regarding PMS symptoms, irregular, painful, or heavy periods and the best way to deal with them can be answered during an exam.

The topics of birth control, sexuality, relationships, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections can be openly discussed with your gynecologist, who can offer sound advice and treatment if necessary. Your gynecologist can also refer you to an outside resource if there is an issue that can’t be handled in your doctor’s office. If you’re over 21 but under 29, you should have a pelvic exam once a year. This yearly visit should include a General Women’s Wellness Exam including a Pap smear.

If you are pregnant, or trying to get pregnant, your OB/GYN will set up a regular schedule of office visits to monitor the development of your pregnancy and your overall health. These visits will cover everything from prenatal care and proper nutrition during your pregnancy, all the way through labor, delivery, and postpartum care. An ultrasound is usually performed at approximately 18 weeks gestation. At that time, we get a good idea of the health and development of your baby, and can usually determine the sex. At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we offer free walk in urine pregnancy tests for our patients’ convenience and confidentiality. If you are pregnant, we provide complete obstetrical and prenatal care, including normal, routine and high-risk pregnancies.

Since gynecology is the branch of medicine dealing with health care for women, especially the diagnosis and treatment of disorders affecting the female reproductive system, it is sound practice to have an annual exam to stay on top of your health. We care for women at every stage of life, from the child bearing years through menopause and beyond. If you are looking for caring OB/GYNs who will work with you to achieve and maintain your best possible health, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

How Does An OB/GYN Test for Pregnancy?

obgyn pregnancy test

If you suspect you may be pregnant, you should schedule an appointment with an OB/GYN as soon as possible. Although many home pregnancy tests are accurate, there is always a chance of receiving a false positive or false negative result. To find out for sure if you are pregnant, and to get more in-depth information, you need to be tested by an OB/GYN. Seeing the doctor early in your pregnancy will help you and your baby stay healthy.

 

How does an OB/GYN test for pregnancy? Both over the counter pregnancy tests and urine tests taken at a doctor’s office work by screening for a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin, or hCG, also known as the pregnancy hormone, that is made when a fertilized egg implants itself in your uterus. This usually happens around six to seven days after egg and sperm become united. One of the benefits of being examined by an OB/GYN if you think you may be pregnant is that the doctor can use blood testing along with a pelvic ultrasound to make sure you are pregnant, and detect any potential problems early so that they can be addressed properly.

 

Both urine tests and blood tests can let you know if you are truly pregnant. One test is designed to detect the pregnancy hormone, hCG, in your urine, while the other test checks your blood. You will need to see an OB/GYN for the blood test. Urine pregnancy tests (known as UPTs) can be performed in your doctor’s office, and is normally the first step in detecting a pregnancy. Your OB/GYN can perform a UPT, a blood test, and a sonogram (a test done during pregnancy that uses reflected sound waves to produce a picture of a fetus) to determine not only if you are indeed pregnant, but also how far along the pregnancy has progressed.

 

The blood tests your doctor performs can detect pregnancy earlier than a home pregnancy test. The drawback is that it usually takes two 24 hours to get results.

 

If you are looking for a caring OB/GYN who will listen to you and work with you to have the best possible experience, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

What Do OBGYNs Do?

what do obgyns doOBGYNs care for and treat women during prenatal, natal, and postnatal periods. They explain procedures and discuss test results or prescribed treatments with patients. They specialize in women’s reproductive health issues, and deliver babies. One of the main responsibilities of an OBGYN is to treat diseases of the female organs. Other responsibilities include diagnosing and treating any problems or issues a woman may have with her reproductive system. Some OBGYNs offer a wide range of general health services similar to your primary care doctor, including routine medical tests and preventive screenings, while others focus on the medical care of the female reproductive system.

A gynecologist treats the overall health of a female patient, beginning with teenagers and spanning the various phases of life of women, up through menopause and beyond. Conditions addressed include treatment of problems or diseases of the reproductive system, such as breast issues, hormonal problems, pelvic disorders, cancer of the cervix, ovarian cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, and uterine problems. A gynecological procedure includes treatment for benign conditions, incontinence, infertility, and cancer.

Some procedures an OBGYN may perform include:
• Novasure Endometrial Ablation
• Essure Tubal Ligation
• Adhesiolysis
• Hysterectomy
• Laparoscopic hysterectomy
• Laparoscopic Tubal Ligation
• Minimally Invasive GYN Surgery
• Colposcopy
• Placement and removal of intrauterine device (IUD)
• Cervical biopsy
• Dilation and Curettage (D&C)

OBGYNs can conduct office visits, perform surgery, and assist with labor and delivery. Some OBGYNs provide services through a solo or private practice. Others do so as part of a larger medical group or hospital. Obstetric and gynecologic surgery refers to procedures that are performed to treat a variety of conditions affecting the female reproductive organs, including the vagina, the uterus, the ovaries, and the fallopian tubes. Here at Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health we provide you with the personalized, comprehensive care you deserve for all phases of your life, not just when you are carrying a child. We are dedicated to providing Colorado’s female population with complete healthcare for every age and condition.

If you are looking for an OBGYN, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.