How Much Weight Is Safe To Gain During Pregnancy?

How much weight is safe to gain during pregnancy

Do you question how much weight is safe for you to gain during pregnancy? This is a common question for mothers-to-be. First of all, you are supposed to gain weight, so it’s important not to stress over it when you do. However, it is important to know how much weight represents a healthy gain for you, and when you should gain it. Gaining too much weight during pregnancy can present health hazards like gestational diabetes, hypertension, preeclampsia, and possible complications during labor and delivery.

Although you will need extra weight to support your baby’s growth and development, “eating for two” is not a healthy approach to eating during your pregnancy, and being pregnant is not a blank ticket to overindulge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released findings on gestational weight gain showing that 47 percent of American moms-to-be gained more than the recommended amount of weight during pregnancy. This put their health and that of their babies at risk both during and after pregnancy.

Not gaining enough weight during pregnancy increases the risk of low birth weight babies and pre-term deliveries. The recommended amount of weight gain depends on your pre-pregnancy weight; if you are overweight when you become pregnant, a weight gain of 15-25 pounds is recommended, if you start at a healthy weight, 25 to 35 pounds is recommended, and if you are underweight, 28 to 40 pounds is the recommendation. A lack of weight gain in the first trimester is not unusual, especially if you suffer from morning sickness. During the second trimester, weight gain should pick up. If you started out pregnancy at a normal weight, you should expect to gain around 14 to 15 pounds, as your baby is growing rapidly during this stage. During the third trimester, your baby’s weight gain will continue, but yours may start to taper off. You should expect a gain of approximately 10 to 12 pounds at this point.

To gain the right amount of weight during pregnancy, don’t use the “eating for two” mentality to double your caloric intake, or you’re likely to gain too much. Start by simply adding a snack of around 300 calories to your daily menu. Your meals and snacks should be comprised of healthy, whole foods whenever possible such as fruits, vegetables, healthy proteins, whole grains, and dairy products. It’s also important to stay hydrated by drinking water throughout the day, and maintain a regular exercise routine, even if it is a simple 30-minute walk around the neighborhood in the morning, at lunch, or after dinner. If you’re carrying twins or multiples, consult with your doctor about the correct amount of weight gain and exercise to maintain optimal health during your pregnancy.

While the volume of food you consume is important, the nutrition it contains is paramount to having a healthy pregnancy. When it comes to satisfying cravings, getting the protein and healthy fats that you and your baby need is the key. A high protein, high fat snack will keep you fuller longer than a snack consisting of processed carbohydrates. Think yogurt, cheese, and peanut butter instead of chips, crackers, or cookies.

At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we offer complete obstetrical and prenatal care, for both routine and high-risk pregnancies. We care for women at every stage of life, from the child bearing years through menopause and beyond. If you are looking for caring OB/GYNs who will work with you to achieve and maintain your best possible health, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to meeting you.

False Negative Pregnancy Test Results

False Negative Pregnancy Test Results

For many women, a home pregnancy test is the first indication they have of being pregnant. Unfortunately, sometimes these tests can return a false negative result. In other words, the test may say “not pregnant” when in reality you are pregnant. Sometimes a test can also return a false positive result, detecting pregnancy where none exists, but false negative results are much more common, with as many as 9 out of 15 women testing negative until seven or eight weeks. How does this happen? What could cause a pregnancy test to return a negative result when you are actually pregnant?

One reason a pregnancy test may return a false negative result is that the test is simply taken too early in the pregnancy to properly detect the presence of a developing fetus. The sooner after a missed period a home pregnancy test is taken, the harder it is for the test to detect the pregnancy hormone human chorionic gonadotrophin, or hCG. Every test is different, and some are more sensitive than others. A pregnancy test can usually detect hCG levels within 10 days of a missed period. Some tests can detect hCG even earlier, within a week of conception, but no test is 100% accurate.

Another reason you may receive a false negative on a home pregnancy test is that hCG levels vary from person to person, and your individual hCG level may be too low to be detected on a home pregnancy test. If your home pregnancy test comes back negative after a missed period, wait one week and retest. Some women may take up to three weeks after a missed period before a detectable level of hCG is produced. A negative result from a home pregnancy test does not unconditionally rule out pregnancy or ectopic pregnancy.

A third reason for a false negative result on a pregnancy test is diluted urine. If you drink a lot of water, it will dilute the hCG in your urine, and could cause you to get a false negative. Test your urine again upon rising in the morning, as this urine will have the most concentrated amounts of hCG.

It’s also possible to experience symptoms normally associated with pregnancy such as mood swings, swollen breasts and food cravings, which may be caused by PMS rather than pregnancy. On the other hand, you might experience what appears to be a menstrual period, even though you are pregnant. If you are having some vaginal bleeding but suspect you might be pregnant even though you have received a negative result from a home pregnancy test, it’s time to talk to your medical provider. Your doctor can conduct urine and blood tests to help determine if you are pregnant. Although it’s less likely, it is still possible to be pregnant even if urine and blood tests come back negative.

If you still believe you are pregnant after receiving negative urine and blood test results, your medical provider can perform a transvaginal ultrasound to determine whether you are pregnant. A pregnancy in your uterus should be visible six weeks after your last menstrual period. If there are no signs of an embryo or fetus in the uterus and your hCG levels are elevated or rising, an ectopic pregnancy could be the culprit.

At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we care for women at every stage of life, from the child bearing years through menopause and beyond. We offer women complete prenatal and obstetrical care, for both routine and high-risk pregnancies. If you are looking for a caring OB/GYN who will work with you to achieve and maintain your best possible health at every stage of your life, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health, and live your best life.

How Often Do You Visit the OBGYN During Pregnancy?

are obgyns considered primary physicians

Are you pregnant and wondering how often you should see your OB/GYN? If you are pregnant, your OB/GYN will set up a regular schedule of office visits to monitor the development of your pregnancy and your overall health. If you don’t have a primary care physician or did not meet with a health care provider before you became pregnant, your first prenatal visit will be around eight weeks after your last menstrual period. If your cycles are irregular, you should schedule a visit with an OB/GYN as soon after a urine pregnancy test is positive. At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we offer free walk in urine pregnancy tests. Most pregnant women have between ten and 15 prenatal visits during the course of their pregnancy. A typical schedule will look like this:

• Weeks 4 to 28: One prenatal visit per month

• Weeks 28 to 36: One prenatal visit every 2 weeks

• Weeks 36 to 40: One prenatal visit per week

During your office visits, your OB/GYN will discuss prenatal care and proper nutrition during your pregnancy, labor and delivery, and postpartum care. You may need to schedule more frequent office visits if you have special health concerns with your pregnancy. An ultrasound is usually performed in the first trimester to confirm the due date, and another is normally done at 18 to 20 weeks to confirm normal anatomy and development. The second ultrasound is an exciting one, as your OB/GYN can usually determine the sex of the baby at this time. Women over 35 may have one or more ultrasounds done before the baby is born, especially if low levels of amniotic fluid, bleeding, or pre-term contractions are present. Having ultrasounds during your pregnancy poses no risk to you or the baby, including during the third trimester.

At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we offer complete obstetrical and prenatal care, for both routine and high-risk pregnancies. We care for women at every stage of life, from the child bearing years through menopause and beyond. If you are looking for caring OB/GYNs who will work with you to achieve and maintain your best possible health, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

How Often Should You See Your OB/GYN?

Colorado Springs OBGYN

Do you wonder how often you should see a gynecologist or OB/GYN? As a general rule, all women should have a pelvic exam at least once per year. According to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, every woman should see a gynecologist before the age of 21, for several reasons. Although most women do not need to have a pap smear before the age of 21, a gynecological exam is a good idea, as it can reveal undetected health problems that can then receive treatment, such as UTIs and STIs. Questions you may have regarding PMS symptoms, irregular, painful, or heavy periods and the best way to deal with them can be answered during an exam.

The topics of birth control, sexuality, relationships, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections can be openly discussed with your gynecologist, who can offer sound advice and treatment if necessary. Your gynecologist can also refer you to an outside resource if there is an issue that can’t be handled in your doctor’s office. If you’re over 21 but under 29, you should have a pelvic exam once a year. This yearly visit should include a General Women’s Wellness Exam including a Pap smear.

If you are pregnant, or trying to get pregnant, your OB/GYN will set up a regular schedule of office visits to monitor the development of your pregnancy and your overall health. These visits will cover everything from prenatal care and proper nutrition during your pregnancy, all the way through labor, delivery, and postpartum care. An ultrasound is usually performed at approximately 18 weeks gestation. At that time, we get a good idea of the health and development of your baby, and can usually determine the sex. At Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health in Colorado Springs, we offer free walk in urine pregnancy tests for our patients’ convenience and confidentiality. If you are pregnant, we provide complete obstetrical and prenatal care, including normal, routine and high-risk pregnancies.

Since gynecology is the branch of medicine dealing with health care for women, especially the diagnosis and treatment of disorders affecting the female reproductive system, it is sound practice to have an annual exam to stay on top of your health. We care for women at every stage of life, from the child bearing years through menopause and beyond. If you are looking for caring OB/GYNs who will work with you to achieve and maintain your best possible health, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

How Does An OB/GYN Test for Pregnancy?

obgyn pregnancy test

If you suspect you may be pregnant, you should schedule an appointment with an OB/GYN as soon as possible. Although many home pregnancy tests are accurate, there is always a chance of receiving a false positive or false negative result. To find out for sure if you are pregnant, and to get more in-depth information, you need to be tested by an OB/GYN. Seeing the doctor early in your pregnancy will help you and your baby stay healthy.

 

How does an OB/GYN test for pregnancy? Both over the counter pregnancy tests and urine tests taken at a doctor’s office work by screening for a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin, or hCG, also known as the pregnancy hormone, that is made when a fertilized egg implants itself in your uterus. This usually happens around six to seven days after egg and sperm become united. One of the benefits of being examined by an OB/GYN if you think you may be pregnant is that the doctor can use blood testing along with a pelvic ultrasound to make sure you are pregnant, and detect any potential problems early so that they can be addressed properly.

 

Both urine tests and blood tests can let you know if you are truly pregnant. One test is designed to detect the pregnancy hormone, hCG, in your urine, while the other test checks your blood. You will need to see an OB/GYN for the blood test. Urine pregnancy tests (known as UPTs) can be performed in your doctor’s office, and is normally the first step in detecting a pregnancy. Your OB/GYN can perform a UPT, a blood test, and a sonogram (a test done during pregnancy that uses reflected sound waves to produce a picture of a fetus) to determine not only if you are indeed pregnant, but also how far along the pregnancy has progressed.

 

The blood tests your doctor performs can detect pregnancy earlier than a home pregnancy test. The drawback is that it usually takes two 24 hours to get results.

 

If you are looking for a caring OB/GYN who will listen to you and work with you to have the best possible experience, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

What Do OBGYNs Do?

what do obgyns doOBGYNs care for and treat women during prenatal, natal, and postnatal periods. They explain procedures and discuss test results or prescribed treatments with patients. They specialize in women’s reproductive health issues, and deliver babies. One of the main responsibilities of an OBGYN is to treat diseases of the female organs. Other responsibilities include diagnosing and treating any problems or issues a woman may have with her reproductive system. Some OBGYNs offer a wide range of general health services similar to your primary care doctor, including routine medical tests and preventive screenings, while others focus on the medical care of the female reproductive system.

A gynecologist treats the overall health of a female patient, beginning with teenagers and spanning the various phases of life of women, up through menopause and beyond. Conditions addressed include treatment of problems or diseases of the reproductive system, such as breast issues, hormonal problems, pelvic disorders, cancer of the cervix, ovarian cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, and uterine problems. A gynecological procedure includes treatment for benign conditions, incontinence, infertility, and cancer.

Some procedures an OBGYN may perform include:
• Novasure Endometrial Ablation
• Essure Tubal Ligation
• Adhesiolysis
• Hysterectomy
• Laparoscopic hysterectomy
• Laparoscopic Tubal Ligation
• Minimally Invasive GYN Surgery
• Colposcopy
• Placement and removal of intrauterine device (IUD)
• Cervical biopsy
• Dilation and Curettage (D&C)

OBGYNs can conduct office visits, perform surgery, and assist with labor and delivery. Some OBGYNs provide services through a solo or private practice. Others do so as part of a larger medical group or hospital. Obstetric and gynecologic surgery refers to procedures that are performed to treat a variety of conditions affecting the female reproductive organs, including the vagina, the uterus, the ovaries, and the fallopian tubes. Here at Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health we provide you with the personalized, comprehensive care you deserve for all phases of your life, not just when you are carrying a child. We are dedicated to providing Colorado’s female population with complete healthcare for every age and condition.

If you are looking for an OBGYN, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

How to Choose an OBGYN

how to choose an obgyn colorado springs

Only you can decide what is most important to you when it comes to the things you want and need in your OB/GYN. If you are seeing a gynecologist who also practices obstetrics, and you are considering getting pregnant, you can ask your doctor to care for you during your pregnancy. If not, your gynecologist is a good person to ask for a referral to an obstetrician. Another great source for referrals is your circle of friends and relatives who live in your area. If someone you know and trust has an OB/GYN they love, ask her for the contact info for that doctor. If all else fails and you don’t have a good referral source, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) physician directory is an online resource for both members and the public to assist in locating an OB/GYN in your area simply by entering your zip code.

There are certain basic questions you should ask of any OB/GYN to help determine if the two of you are a good fit. After locating a potential candidate in your area (you don’t want to travel too far in case of an emergency), think about your health history. If you are over the age of 40, have had previous pregnancies with problems, or have a chronic illness such as high blood pressure, epilepsy, heart disease, diabetes, or chronic fatigue, find out if the doctor you are considering has any experience dealing with these conditions in their pregnant patients. If you have had a C-section in the past but would like to have a vaginal birth (VBAC), ask if the doctor and hospital you are considering are supportive. Do you want a doula or other advocate present at appointments, classes, and during labor and delivery? If so, make sure this is allowed by and supported by both your doctor and the birthing center or hospital.

Do you have strong opinions about how to handle issues that may arise during your pregnancy and delivery and afterwards, such as fetal monitoring, episiotomy, medication/IVs during labor, breastfeeding, stem cell collection, skin to skin bonding, or other post-partum activities? Discuss all these with your potential doctor before making a decision, as you will want to him or her to be on board with your ideas before entering into a doctor/patient relationship. If you are not comfortable for any reason, don’t feel as though it is easy to communicate with or understand your doctor, or you aren’t sure if the doctor will respect your wishes, keep looking.

If you are looking for a caring OB/GYN who will listen to you and work with you to have the best possible experience, give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

OB/GYN Specializing in PCOS

Polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS, is defined as the presence or growth of small cysts on the outer edges of the ovaries, and is a condition suffered by many women of reproductive age. This condition causes the ovaries to become enlarged, and can cause problems with menstrual cycles and make it difficult to get pregnant, as ovaries may fail to regularly release eggs. If left untreated it can result in the manifestation of other diseases, including diabetes and heart disease, and poses a serious health risk to a large segment of the female population, with over 200,000 reported cases in the U.S. every year.

The cause of PCOS may involve a combination of both genetic and environmental factors, and symptoms can include excess hair growth, acne, and obesity, in addition to disruption of menstrual cycles. Many women with PCOS experience the growth of several cysts, but early detection, weight loss, and proper medical treatment by a qualified health professional can help control the symptoms of this syndrome and prevent long term health problems such as heart disease and type two diabetes.

As excess weight can be a factor in the development of this syndrome, your OB/GYN may suggest you work with a registered dietician to develop an eating plan for greater health and wellness. An exercise regimen customized for your individual situation may also assist in weight loss, which can help ease the symptoms of PCOS and help prevent the development of diabetes.

Here at Colorado Obstetrics and Women’s Health we provide you with the personalized, comprehensive care you deserve for all phases of your life, not just when you are carrying a child. We are dedicated to providing Colorado’s female population with complete healthcare for every age and condition. If you are looking for an OB/GYN specializing in PCOS, give us a call today at
(719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly women’s health professionals. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

Are OB/GYNs Considered Primary Care?

 

Have you ever wondered if your “lady doctor” can also be your primary care physician? An OB/GYN has expertise in pregnancy, childbirth, reproductive system disorders, and other health issues specific to women. Because of this extensive knowledge, these physicians are not limited to are obgyns considered primary physicianstreating just pregnancy, but can function as your primary care physician if you so desire, and your OB/GYN agrees. An OB/GYN is both an obstetrician/gynecologist and a physician specialist, a doctor who has chosen to specialize in the care of women and their reproductive health. An obstetrician deals specifically with the pregnancy and birth processes, and gynecology involves the care of the female reproductive system outside of pregnancy. OB/GYNs are often considered “specialists” by insurance plans and require patients to pay a specialist copay to see them, which is often a more expensive copay than required for a primary care physician.

Many women choose to see their OB/GYN for annual checkups, especially if they are experiencing reproductive system issues, breast problems, or menopausal symptoms. Some OB/GYNs prefer to have a family practice or internal medicine physician follow their patients for medical issues not related to the reproductive system, but your OB/GYN can treat you for breast-related problems, perform pap smears, dilation and curettage (D&C), tubal ligations, pelvic ultrasounds, endometrial or uterine biopsies, diagnose and prescribe treatment for menstrual problems, and treat chronic or life-threatening conditions such as endometriosis, cervical cancer, uterine prolapse, and ovarian cancer. It is possible to have both an OB/GYN and a general practitioner, or even a nurse practitioner as your primary care physician to handle other types of illnesses. Having an ongoing relationship with both types of medical professional will ensure that you have someone who is familiar with your overall healthy and any specific health-related issues in case of illness, or if you should need a referral to a specialist for treatment.

Here at Colorado Obstetrics & Women’s Health we provide the personalized, comprehensive care for all phases of your life, not just when you are carrying a child. We are dedicated to providing Colorado’s female population with complete healthcare for every phase of life. Give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.

Is OB/GYN just for pregnancy?

Is OB/GYN just for pregnancy?Have you ever wondered exactly what an OB/GYN is? OB/GYN is the abbreviation for obstetrician/gynecologist, and means that the person with this designation behind his or her name is a physician specialist, a doctor who has chosen to specialize in the care of women and their reproductive health. The field of obstetrics deals specifically with pregnancy and birth, while gynecology involves the care of the female reproductive system outside of pregnancy.

An OB/GYN can provide medical and surgical care to women, and because of specializing in these fields has expertise in pregnancy, childbirth, reproductive system disorders with control, and other health issues specific to women. Because of this expansive expertise, OB/GYN is not just for pregnancy; you may even choose to have an OB/GYN as your primary care physician, depending on your individual health care needs.

Your OB/GYN can coordinate care with a specialist in another field of medicine, if a condition is present which requires special care and treatment. Within the OB/GYN designation there are four primary subspecialties; gynecologic oncology, reproductive endocrinology and infertility, maternal fetal medicine, and female pelvic medicine (which includes reconstructive surgery, if necessary). Gynecology is not limited to “everything below the waist” as some people believe. Your OB/GYN can take care of breast problems as well as doing pap smears, diagnosing and prescribing treatment for menstrual problems, performing dilation and curettage (D&C), tubal ligations, pelvic ultrasounds, endometrial or uterine biopsies, and treating chronic or life-threatening conditions such as endometriosis, cervical cancer, uterine prolapse, and ovarian cancer.

As you can see, an OB/GYN is trained in more than just delivering babies and treating pregnant women. We here at Colorado Obstetrics & Women’s Health provide personalized, comprehensive care for all phases of a woman’s life, not just when you are carrying a child. We are dedicated to providing Colorado’s female population with complete healthcare. Give us a call today at (719) 634-8800 to schedule an appointment. We look forward to helping you achieve your best health.